man doing massage for client in salon

Remedial Massage for Osteoarthritis

What is Osteoarthritis?

Osteoarthritis is also known as Degenerative Arthritis of the spine, but can damage any joint of the body, like your hands, knees, or hip. It is a condition in which the protective cartilage that cushions the tops of bones degenerates or wears down, which often referred as a “wear and tear” disease. This causes swelling and pain. It may also cause the development of osteophytes, or bone spurs.

How does massage help with Osteoarthritis?

Osteoarthritis can be painful and for some individual may affect their flexibility and range of motion, weaken the muscles and induce spasms.

10 Benefits of Remedial Therapy for Osteoarthritis

Increased Blood Flow and Circulation. Which bring back critical nutrients and improve the strength to the strain muscles and tissues caused by the degenerative disc.

  1. Increased Blood Flow and Circulation. Which bring back critical nutrients and improve the strength to the strain muscles and tissues caused by the degenerative disc.
  2. Decrease Tension and pain in the muscles
  3. Decrease Sympathetic Nervous System from firing
  4. Reduce compression on the disc and nerves
  5. Reduce pain and spasm and trigger points
  6. Maintain tissue health
  7. Massage also keeps tissues surrounding the disc healthy
  8. Increase the body natural pain killing endorphins
  9. Decrease hormones and depression
  10. Improve sleep and immune functions

What you need to tell your massage therapist prior to your treatment:

It is important that your massage therapist is aware of your diagnosed condition, as there are many forms of arthritis, each with their own treatment needs and precautions. You should advise them of your medical treatments and other medical conditions.

In follow-up consultations, be sure to update your therapist about the effects of the previous treatment and of any changes to your condition.

Who Gets Osteoarthritis of the spine?

Factors that can increase your risk of osteoarthritis include:

  • Older age. The risk of osteoarthritis increases with age.
  • Sex. Women are more likely to develop osteoarthritis, though it isn’t clear why.
  • Obesity. Carrying extra body weight contributes to osteoarthritis in several ways, and the more you weigh, the greater your risk. Increased weight adds stress to weight-bearing joints, such as your hips and knees. Also, fat tissue produces proteins that can cause harmful inflammation in and around your joints.
  • Joint injuries. Injuries, such as those that occur when playing sports or from an accident, can increase the risk of osteoarthritis. Even injuries that occurred many years ago and seemingly healed can increase your risk of osteoarthritis.
  • Repeated stress on the joint. If your job or a sport you play places repetitive stress on a joint, that joint might eventually develop osteoarthritis.
  • Genetics. Some people inherit a tendency to develop osteoarthritis.
  • Bone deformities. Some people are born with malformed joints or defective cartilage.
  • Certain metabolic diseases. These include diabetes and a condition in which your body has too much iron (hemochromatosis).

What Are the Symptoms of Osteoarthritis of the Spine?

Osteoarthritis symptoms often develop slowly and worsen over time. Signs and symptoms of osteoarthritis include:

  • Pain. Affected joints might hurt during or after movement.
  • Stiffness. Joint stiffness might be most noticeable upon awakening or after being inactive.
  • Tenderness. Your joint might feel tender when you apply light pressure to or near it.
  • Loss of flexibility. You might not be able to move your joint through its full range of motion.
  • Grating sensation. You might feel a grating sensation when you use the joint, and you might hear popping or crackling.
  • Bone spurs. These extra bits of bone, which feel like hard lumps, can form around the affected joint.
  • Swelling. This might be caused by soft tissue inflammation around the joint.

Osteoarthritis is a degenerative disease that worsens over time, often resulting in chronic pain. Joint pain and stiffness can become severe enough to make daily tasks difficult.

Depression and sleep disturbances can result from the pain and disability of osteoarthritis.

When to see a doctor

If you have joint pain or stiffness that doesn’t go away, make an appointment with your doctor.

During your visit your condition will be assessed and steps taken to assist with your rehabilitation. After the session FREE muscle stretching sheets can be provided to assist with healing your injury. It is recommended that you continue these exercises at home to speed up the healing process. To book in for a session, please call Jade Tran on 0425 444 304. I hope you found the article helpful in further understanding your symptoms. Any opinions expressed within my articles/blog are from my personal perspective, not that of my Professional Associations / Educational Institutions
.Articles are intended to convey information only and should not being misconstrued as medical advice. If you have any concerns regard to medical matter, you need to consult a professional healthcare provider.

 I will not compensate you in any way what so ever should you happen to suffer death/injury/loss/inconvenience/damage due to the information contain in this article.